Christiana Bratiotis

Session: Hoarding and Domestic Squalor

Christiana BratiotisDr. Christiana Bratiotis received her Doctororate at Boston University in the Interdisciplinary Social Work and Sociology program in 2009. Upon completion of her doctoral studies, Dr. Bratiotis was awarded a three year post-doctoral research fellowship at Boston University School of Social Work, where she served as director of the Hoarding Research Project.

Currently, Dr. Bratiotis is an Assistant Professor at the University of Portland State University in the Department of Social Work where she teaches graduate level clinical practice courses. Dr. Bratiotis has presented at multiple national and international conferences on hoarding and is the author of the book titled “The Hoarding Handbook: A Guide for Human Service Professionals”, a primary text for management of hoarding.

Dr. Bratiotis provides individual and group specialized outpatient cognitive behavioral therapy for hoarding disorder. In addition to providing clinical treatment, she offers national and international consultation on hoarding disorder to families and communities.  She’s given more than 120 invited community lectures, agency clinical trainings and academic presentations on the nature and treatment of hoarding.

Dr Bratiotis is a founding member of the Greater Boston Regional Hoarding Network and her work is nationally recognised for its comprehensive and collaborative approach.  She has served as director for two non-profit organizations and has over 15 years of experience working in and with communities to build capacity and address issues of diversity and social justice.

Jyothi V. Robertson

Session: Hoarding and Domestic Squalor

Jyothi V. RobertsonDr. Jyothi V. Robertson is a Shelter Medicine Consultant alumnus with the Koret Shelter Medicine Program (KSMP) at the University of California-Davis. Dr. Robertson was the Lead Veterinarian in charge of animal cruelty investigations and Medical Director for Oakland Animal Services from 2007 to 2013. Her work at Oakland and during her Residency in Shelter Medicine focused on Animal Hoarding and a multidisciplinary approach to handling hoarding cases. Dr. Robertson is a national expert on animal welfare issues, including animal cruelty.

Dr. Robertson holds board positions on the Editorial Board for the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, the Advisory Board for Shelter Animals Count, the national database project, and the Fear-Free Advisory Board. Dr. Robertson is the Delegate representing the California Shelter Veterinary Medical Association in the CVMA and is the alternate Delegate to the Animal Welfare Committee of the AVMA.

Dr. Robertson received her veterinary degree from the University of California-Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine, followed by a residency in Shelter Medicine through the Koret Shelter Medicine Program, and her undergraduate degree from Princeton University.

Dr. Robertson has over 20 years of scientific research experience and has investigated topics ranging from Lyme’s disease to canine respiratory disease. Her current research interests include feline upper respiratory tract disease and animal hoarding. Dr. Robertson speaks nationally on topics in shelter medicine with an emphasis on infectious diseases and animal cruelty. She resides in the San Francisco Bay Area with her husband, three children, one dog, two cats, four fish, and five mice.

Freda Scott-Park

Lock Lomond, Scotland

_005Dr Freda Scott-Park BVM&S, PhD, Hon.DVM&S, MRCVS is a veterinary surgeon living and working in Scotland. Her paid work is reading ECGs derived from studies into new pharmaceutical compounds with a view to detecting cardiac abnormalities that could be a problem in their clinical use in humans.

In a pro bono role, Freda has been associated with the Links Group (a committed multi-agency interest group that promotes the welfare and safety of vulnerable children, animals and adults so that they are free from violence and abuse) since the first Links conference in November 2001. At this conference, the veterinary profession were introduced to the concept of the “battered pet” and further research and clinical evidence was presented, which suggested that there are sometimes inter-relationships commonly referred to as ‘links’, between the abuse of children, vulnerable adults and animals.

During her time as President of the British Small Animal Veterinary Association and following that, as President of the British Veterinary Association, Freda sought to ensure that veterinary surgeons were made aware of their role in recognising animal abuse, and beyond that, the possibility of associated violence to humans in a violent home.

Freda is currently Chairman of the Links Group (UK), which aims to help all members – humans and animals – of families affected by domestic abuse. The Links Group in the UK offers practical help and advice to vets and health professionals, as well as helping to make people understand why hurting humans and animals is unacceptable.

Erin Wasson

Session: Veterinary Social Work Initiative

Erin WassonErin Wasson MSW, RSW is a registered social worker who has worked clinically in a number of areas, including: mental health, addictions, crisis response, interpersonal violence, trauma, disordered eating, geriatrics, disability, and youth work. She has spent her career working with individuals, groups, and communities as an advocate, clinician, and educator with the goal of promoting resiliency. A central tenant to Erin’s work is a holistic approach to practice, which includes biological, psychological, social, and spiritual assessment and intervention. This approach, combined with different theories and practices, helps Erin to explore with clients the context of their experiences that lead to relational connection and disconnection within their lives.
In 2014 Erin, implemented the Veterinary Social Work services at the University of Saskatchewan, Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM), the first of its kind in Canada. From a one health perspective, she continues to work as a social worker at the WCVM, providing services to clients of the Veterinary Medical Centre; as well as resources to staff, faculty, and students. Additionally, Erin has been active in the promotion of health, wellbeing, and tangible self-care strategies with veterinarians and allied professions. This includes providing resources, support and educational seminars to professional associations, animal protection agencies, and other groups who manage the challenges that arise in the interface of the human and animal bond.

Michelle Lem

Ottawa, Ontario

Session: One Welfare in Homeless Populations

Michelle LemDr. Michelle Lem is a 2001 graduate of the Ontario Veterinary College (OVC), and the founder of Community Veterinary Outreach, a veterinary-based registered charity that has provided pro bono preventive veterinary care for animals of the homeless and marginally housed in Ottawa since 2003. This program has been successfully reproduced in other communities and is demonstrating how veterinary care can be leveraged to engage marginalized pet owners in social services and health care for themselves. Community Veterinary Outreach programs also operate in Hamilton, Toronto and Kitchener-Waterloo, and Guelph, Ontario CANADA.

After graduating, Dr. Lem practiced in New Zealand before returning to Ottawa, where she has practiced companion animal medicine and surgery as an associate veterinarian, companion animal mobile service and locum. From 2003 to 2009, Dr. Lem provided behavioural consultations for companion animals on a referral basis; was the contract veterinarian for Department of National Defence’s military working dogs from 2009 till 2011; and taught in the Veterinary Assistant and Technician programs at Algonquin College from 2004 till 2014.

In 2009, Dr. Lem received an OVC fellowship to pursue graduate research in the Department of Population Medicine, studying the effects of pet ownership on street-involved youth, receiving her MSc in 2012. Her research has been published in peer-reviewed journals including the Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, Anthrozoös, and the Canadian Veterinary Journal. Dr. Lem has also authored a chapter on street-involved youth in the 2016 Springer Publication “Men and Their Dogs: A New Psychological Understanding of ‘Man’s Best Friend”, and speaks internationally on her research and outreach work, One Health (the human-animal-environment interface), animals in society, and social change and leadership.

Dr. Lem has served on the College of Veterinarians of Ontario’s (CVO) Shelter Medicine Task Force and represented the CVO on Emergency Management Ontario’s (EMO) committee for resourcing. Dr. Lem is an active member of the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA) as a trained member of the Canadian Veterinary Reserve and serves on the CVMA’s Animal Welfare Committee.

In 2011, Dr. Lem received the Ottawa Humane Society’s Muriel Davies Award for her contribution to animal welfare in the Ottawa community. Her outreach work has been recognized at the Summit for Urban Animal Strategies, where she was awarded the Thought Leadership Scholarship and Individual Achievement Award in 2011, the Community Collaboration Award in 2013, the OVC Young Alumnus Award in 2014, and the CVMA’s President’s Award in 2015. In 2012, Dr. Lem was humbled to receive the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal for her service. In May 2013, Dr. Lem was elected as an Ashoka Fellow, one of 65 Canadian Fellows and joining an international community of 3,000 leading social entrepreneurs in over 70 countries (www.ashoka.org).

Website: vetoutreach.org

Colleen Marion & Stéfane Gravelle

Session: Prairie Mountain Inter-Agency Hoarding Coalition: A collaborative Approach to Address Hoarding and Domestic Squalor

Colleen Marion

Winnipeg, Manitoba
Manitoba Agriculture – Office of the Chief Veterinary Officer
Colleen MarionDr. Colleen Marion is employed with Manitoba Agriculture’s Office of the Chief Veterinary Officer as their Companion Animal Welfare Veterinarian. Dr. Marion graduated from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine in 1999, and was appointed as an animal protection officer to enforce Manitoba’s Animal Care Act in 2004. Dr. Marion strives to work collaboratively with other law enforcement agencies in addition to human and animal health and welfare agencies, to improve the health and well-being of people and the animals that are part of their lives.

Stéfane Gravelle

Brandon, Manitoba

Stephane GravelleStéfane Gravelle is a frontline Environmental Public Health professional currently employed with Manitoba’s Department of Health. He is board certified by the Canadian Institute of Public Health Inspectors (CIPHI) and holds a Bachelor of Applied Science from Ryerson University. After certifying in 1993, he spent the following decade working in northern Manitoba with diverse communities and managing environmental health risks associated with various developments such as: mining operations, hydro-electrical projects, contaminated sites and aging municipal infrastructure.

Stéfane Gravelle currently works in western and northern Manitoba conducting risk assessment & health hazard management work with the province’s Health Protection Unit dealing with: rental housing standards, food safety, care facilities, personal service facilities, air quality, water quality and communicable disease investigations. He is a proponent for good Public Health policy, inter-professional collaboration and evidence-based intervention strategies designed to benefit current and future generations of Canadians. He is a founding member of the Prairie Mountain Inter-Agency Hoarding Coalition (PMIHC).

Darlene Chalmers

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

Session: PAWSitive Impact of Animal Assisted Interventions

CHALMERS Photo One WelfareDarlene Chalmers is an Assistant Professor at the University of Regina Faculty of Social Work, Saskatoon Campus. Dr. Chalmer’s research interests include the human-animal interaction and in particular animal-assisted interventions and veterinary social work. Her dissertation research focused on human and horse interaction, centering on how these interactions may enhance human development and animal welfare. She was also a lead researcher on a team examining the use of equine-assisted learning as a treatment adjunct for volatile substance misuse with First Nations youth in Saskatchewan. She has published a number of peer reviewed articles in this field. She is currently co-developing a prison therapy dog program. She is also the co-chair of the Veterinary Social Work Initiative Committee at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Chalmers has over a year’s experience as a handler with a St. John Ambulance therapy dog, and is certified in Facilitated Equine Experiential Learning/Psychotherapy.

Stéfane Gravelle

Brandon, Manitoba

Stephane GravelleStéfane Gravelle is a frontline Environmental Public Health professional currently employed with Manitoba’s Department of Health. He is board certified by the Canadian Institute of Public Health Inspectors (CIPHI) and holds a Bachelor of Applied Science from Ryerson University. After certifying in 1993, he spent the following decade working in northern Manitoba with diverse communities and managing environmental health risks associated with various developments such as: mining operations, hydro-electrical projects, contaminated sites and aging municipal infrastructure.

Stéfane Gravelle currently works in western and northern Manitoba conducting risk assessment & health hazard management work with the province’s Health Protection Unit dealing with: rental housing standards, food safety, care facilities, personal service facilities, air quality, water quality and communicable disease investigations. He is a proponent for good Public Health policy, inter-professional collaboration and evidence-based intervention strategies designed to benefit current and future generations of Canadians. He is a founding member of the Prairie Mountain Inter-Agency Hoarding Coalition (PMIHC).

Brenda Lovell

Winnipeg, Manitoba

Session: Compassion Fatigue in Veterinary Medicine

Brenda LovellBrenda has a Masters of Education degree, and has been working on research, & education on topics ranging from health promotion, burnout, bullying, & communications. She has published her research papers in peer reviewed journals.

David Wiens

Grunthal, Manitoba

Session: proAction Program

David WiensIn July 2011, Mr. David Wiens was elected to the Executive Committee of Dairy Farmers of Canada. He was elected to the Dairy Farmers of Manitoba (DFM) board in the fall of 1995 and to the DFM Chair in December 2006. He was Chair of Dairy Farmers of Canada’s Promotion Committee from 2002 to 2005. Since 2000, David has sat on the Ste. Anne Co-op Oil board of directors. In 2009, he was appointed as a director on the Manitoba Cattle Enhancement Council.

Website: dairyfarmers.ca/proaction

Marilou Chanrasmi

Minneapolis, MN, USA

Session: Building a Framework to Bring Sustainable Veterinary Care to First Nations: Leech Lake Nation as a Model

MLandAhnung_highrezMarilou’s heart-centered leadership style is guided by the belief that meaningful innovation and sustaining transformation requires a deep understanding of ourselves, and the communities around us. She founded Minnesota Partnership for Animal Welfare (a coalition of 30+ animal welfare groups) in 2009 and Leech Lake Legacy (an animal welfare organization serving Leech Lake Reservation) in 2011. She now serves as Vice President of Community Healing Programs for the Native America Humane Society. Marilou believes every voice matters — and through community, authentic connections, collaboration, and the honoring and celebrating of indigenous ways, we can create space for healing.

Marilou shares her home in Bloomington, MN with 4 rescued dogs: Missy and Mister, and her 2 Leech Lake reserve pups, Legacy and Ishkode.

Website: nativeamericahumane.org

Michael Rosmann

Harlan, Iowa

Session: Psychosocial Health and Agriculture

Michael RosmanDr. Rosmann is a clinical psychologist, farmer, professor and writer. He holds a bachelor degree in psychology from the University of Colorado and master and Ph.D. degrees in clinical psychology from the University of Utah. His life’s work is to advance local, state, national and international food production policy, research and services that protect the welfare of food producers, especially their behavioral health, respect for the land, animals and resources in the production of food, fibers and biofuels. He writes a weekly “Farm and Ranch Life” column about agricultural behavioral health and other agricultural topics that is published in 25 U.S., Canadian, and Australian newspapers that has 4.2 million regular readers. He is Adjunct Professor in the Department of Occupational and Environmental Health at the University of Iowa.

Gary Vroegindewey

Gary VroegindeweyDr. Vroegindewey is the Director, One Health Program, Lincoln Memorial University College of Veterinary Medicine; Adjunct Assistant Professor, Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine.  He graduated from the University of Missouri (BA- Zoology; DVM Veterinary Medicine), holds a Master of Strategic Studies and is a Diplomate in the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine.

Dr. Vroegindewey is Chair, OIE (World Organization for Animal Health) ad hoc Group on Disaster Management and Risk Reduction in Relation to Animal Health and Welfare and Veterinary Public Health and former Chairman, International Affairs Committee of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges, former Chair-Veterinary Section of World Association on Disaster and Emergency Medicine, former member White House Security Council Food and Agriculture Working Group, former DOD Liaison to Department of Homeland Security, US Department of Agriculture, and US Food and Drug Administration.

Dr. Vroegindewey served in multiple senior positions in the US Army Veterinary Corps including: Assistant Chief, Veterinary Corps and Director, DOD Veterinary Service Activity, Office of the Surgeon General.

Phil Arkow

Stratford, New Jersey

Session: The “Dark Side” of the Human-Animal Bond: Animal Abuse as an Indicator and Predictor of Abuse of Vulnerable Populations

Phil ArkowInternationally acclaimed lecturer, author and educator Phil Arkow is coordinator of the National Link Coalition – the National Resource Center on The Link between Animal Abuse and Human Violence – and editor of its monthly LINK-Letter. He chairs the Latham Foundation’s Animal Abuse and Family Violence Prevention Project. He teaches courses on Animal Abuse and Human Violence at the University of Florida, and on Human-Animal Interactions at the University of Pennsylvania, Harcum College and Camden County College. He trains internationally and has presented over 200 times in 15 countries and 38 states, and has authored or edited over 75 key reference works in the field of human-animal interactions and violence prevention.

He was one of the founders of the National Link Coalition, the National Animal Control Association, and the Colorado and New Jersey federations of animal welfare agencies. He has served with the American Veterinary Medical Association, the ASPCA, the American Humane Association, the Delta Society, the Animals & Society Institute, the National Coalition on Violence Against Animals, the National District Attorneys Association, the Academy on Violence & Abuse, and the American Association of Human-Animal Bond Veterinarians. He recently received a Lifetime Achievement Award from New Jersey Child Assault Prevention.

Website: NationalLinkCoalition.org

Catherine Devitt

Dublin, Ireland

Session: Professional Responses to the Human Dimension of Farm-Animal Welfare: Lessons and Challenges from Ireland

Catherine DevittCatherine has a Masters in Social Science from University College Dublin, and is currently completing her PhD in Wageningen University (Netherlands) on responses to the human dimension of farm animal welfare in Ireland. Catherine has published research on this human dimension, and the challenges that arise for government and private veterinarians when responding. She has also published on the methodological challenges that arise when conducting sensitive social science research into farm animal welfare.

More widely, Catherine has over ten years of social science experience, with direct involvement in leading research projects across a range of subject areas including mental health, on-farm attitudinal and behavioural change, herd health management, farm animal welfare, and more recently, climate change and environmental policy.

Debbie Stoewen

Oakville, Ontario, Canada

Session: Compassion Fatigue at the Intersection of Human and Animal Welfare

Debbie StoewenAs a veterinarian and social worker, Debbie is the CEO (Care & Empathy Officer) and Director of Veterinary Services for Pets Plus Us. She has a strong belief in the need for, and value of, interdisciplinary approaches to enhance the health and welfare of humans and animals. To this end, while doing her Master of Social Work she specialized in the link between animal abuse and human-directed violence, and has since shared her awareness at schools of social work and veterinary medicine as well as agencies and conferences. With a recent focus on the health and wellbeing of those in animal health and welfare, she offers a Canada-wide fully accredited veterinary continuing education program called “The Social Side of Practice.” Through this program, she helps those in veterinary medicine and animal welfare learn about the nonmedical/nontechnical realities of their work, such as compassion fatigue, and how to maintain resilience. With over 20 years on the frontlines as a veterinary clinical practitioner, she is well tuned in to the experience of compassion fatigue and the pitfalls in trying to manage it. She has written a number of articles as well as a veterinary textbook chapter and speaks internationally on the topic.

Website: petsplusus.com

Anne Fawcett

Sydney, Australia

Session: Developing the One Welfare Teaching Portal

My Dog's Territory http://mydogsterritory.com.au
My Dog’s Territory http://mydogsterritory.com.au

Anne Fawcett is a lecturer in the Faculty of Veterinary Science at the University of Sydney and a companion animal veterinarian with an interest in ethics and animal welfare. At the University she was one of the collaborators developing the One Welfare portal.

She has written over 30 peer-reviewed articles on veterinary ethics and aspects of primary veterinary care and has co-written a textbook of veterinary ethics with Dr Siobhan Mullan (5M, forthcoming).

Jacqueline Wepruk

Alberta, Canada

Session: TBA

Jackie Wepruk has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology from the University of Winnipeg, and a Master of Environmental Design from the University of Calgary.

Upon completing her master’s degree, Jackie was involved in a variety of farm animal welfare contracts with the Alberta Farm Animal Care Association (AFAC) and other farm organizations.

She has been the General Manager of the National Farm Animal Care Council (NFACC) since its inception in 2005. In this capacity she facilitates a partnership between farmed animal industries, governments, the veterinary community, the humane movement and other allied groups. She assists NFACC’s partners in achieving practical solutions to farm animal welfare concerns that address the interests of farmers, domestic and export markets, governments and the Canadian public.

Home life includes a kennel of Siberian Huskies that Jackie competes with in obedience trails and mid-distance sled dog races. Winters are spent training and racing in Canada and the U.S.

Website: nfacc.ca

Maxine Holmqvist

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Session: Strategies for Building Resilience

Holmqvist_headshotMaxine Holmqvist received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Saskatchewan, where she was a founding member of the Student Wellness Initiative Toward Community Health, a student-run interprofessional health clinic located in a core neighbourhood of Saskatoon. Her research interests include psychological influences on health and health-related behaviour, innovative methods of health care delivery, particularly for underserved populations, and interprofessional education and collaborative care. Clinically, she works both in hospital and community settings, providing treatment and consultation to a variety of healthcare teams. She also is an assistant professor in the Department of Clinical Health Psychology and the theme lead for health psychology in the undergraduate medical curriculum, where she collaborates with different course leaders to deliver sessions on evidence-based behavioural treatments, communication skills and strategies for increasing clinical effectiveness. She has a long-standing interest in resilience, both as it applies to patients and healthcare providers, and is a life-long animal lover.